Institute News

May 2017: Yong Zeng among KU Cancer Center researchers awarded $1.2M grant from NCI

Yong Zeng (Assistant Professor of Chemistry at KU), along with Andrew Godwin (Director of Molecular Oncology at the KU Medical Center), has been awarded a $1.2M R33 grant from the National Cancer Institute for proposed research on "Integrated Exosomes Profiling for Minimally Invasive Diagnosis and Monitoring of Cancer." The grant will allow Zeng and Godwin to continue their work toward developing new technologies to profile circulating exosomes, which are emerging as a new paradigm of "liquid biopsy" for non-invasive cancer diagnosis and monitoring, particularly for use in diagnosing Ewing Sarcoma (EWS). Both investigators are affiliated with the KU Cancer Center: Godwin is KUCC's deputy director, and Zeng is a KUCC member.

For more information about this award, please see the KU Cancer Center's news release.


April 2017: Mike Johnson, one of ACS's 'Must See Presenters' at Spring 2017 National Meeting, speaks on latest "chemobrain" findings

Mike Johnson (Associate Professor of Chemistry) presented his latest research findings on a possible therapeutic intervention for "chemobrain" at the American Chemical Society's Spring 2017 National Meeting in San Francisco as one of ACS's 20 'Must See Presenters'. "Chemobrain" refers to the cognitive impairment plaguing up to a third of cancer patients following chemotherapy. Johnson's research in this area, initially supported through his his COBRE CMADP Research Project funding, is now supported through an ACS institutional grant to the KU Cancer Center.

For the full story on Johnson's latest findings, please see KU Today's featured article: "Research suggests potential therapy to prevent 'chemobrain' in cancer patients"


March 8, 2017: Michigan Professor of Chemistry & Pharmacology receives Ralph N. Adams Award

Kennedy photoThe recipient of the 2017 Ralph N. Adams Award in Bioanalytical Chemistry is Robert T. Kennedy, the Hobart H. Willard Distinguished University Professor of Chemistry and Professor of Pharmacology at the University of Michigan. Kennedy’s research interests are bioanalytical chemistry and its application to neuroscience, endocrinology, and biotechnology. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and has received numerous awards including the ACS Findeis Award, the McKnight Award for Technical Innovations in Neuroscience, the EAS Separation Science Award, and the Golay Award for Achievements in Chromatography. He is presently Associate Editor of Analytical Chemistry and Chair of the University of Michigan Chemistry Department.

Photo Copyright Notice: 2017 Roy Engelbrecht – royephoto.com

February 2017: Sue Lunte Group Student wins SLAS Academic Travel Award

Tom Linz photo

Shamal Gunawardhana, a graduate student in Sue Lunte's lab, received a Tony B. Academic Travel Award to present a poster on his research at the Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening (SLAS) 2017 International Conference and Exhibition in Washington, DC. SLAS grants these travel awards annually to students, postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty who have demonstrated outstanding achievement in laboratory sciences and technology. The work Shamal presented at SLAS2017 was mainly focused on the development of a microchip electrophoresis-electrochemical (ME-EC) detection based separation sensor for monitoring adenosine and its metabolites as biomarkers in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Successful development of the ME-EC system would help for near real-time monitoring of concentration fluctuations of biomarkers of interest, which will lead to a better understanding of the biochemical mechanism of neurodegeneration happens after TBI.


February 2017: Yong Zeng co-authors a Top Downloaded article in Lab on a Chip

The Royal Society of Chemistry's journal Lab on a Chip has highlighted a paper co-authored by Yong Zeng (Assistant Professor of Chemistry at KU) in a web collection featuring the journal's 25 most downloaded articles of 2016. Originally appearing as the journal cover story for the January 26, 2016 edition of Lab on a Chip, Zeng's article is titled "A microfluidic ExoSearch chip for multiplexed exosome detection towards blood-based ovarian cancer diagnosis." The paper describes a continuous-flow ExoSearch chip which, when integrated with in situ, multiplexed exosomal marker detection, offers an essentially needed platform for utilization of exosomes in clinical cancer diagnosis.

Free access to the full text of the article in Lab on a Chip is available via PubMed Central, and the journal's entire collection of Top Downloaded articles for 2016 is available on their website.


January 2017: Sue Lunte Group alum studies new technique to detect extraterrestrial life 

Jessica Creamer, a former graduate student in Sue Lunte's group, is part of a research team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) studying a new technique to detect extraterrestrial life by looking for chemical distribution patterns (biosignatures) unique to life. Creamer's article in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, entitled "Enhanced Resolution of Chiral Amino Acids with Capillary Electrophoresis for Biosignature Detection in Extraterrestrial Samples", describes two capillary electrophoresis methods capable of resolving 17 amino acids found in high abundance in both biotic and abiotic samples. Creamer and her colleagues at JPL are working to transfer these new methods to an instrument described as a portable, battery-powered "chemical laptop" that might one day be sent for use aboard a spacecraft.

Creamer received her PhD in pharmaceutical chemistry from KU in 2014 and is currently a postdoctoral associate at JPL in Pasadena, CA. Forbes.com and the online news outlet Quartz have also picked up the story, including interviews with Creamer and her postdoctoral advisor Peter Willis.


August 2016: Yong Zeng awarded NIH R21 grant

Zeng photoYong Zeng, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has received a two-year R21 grant from the NIH's National Cancer Institute for his project "Integrated Digital Microfluidic Platforms for Next-Generation Glycomics." Zeng's proposed work aims to develop a new biomedical microsystem that can catalyze breakthroughs in elucidating the pathological roles of protein glycosylation and in developing reliable biomarkers for early diagnosis and better treatment of disease. The microsystem will also be adaptable for potential use in point-of-care and clinical settings.


May 2016: Mike Johnson's 'chemobrain' research featured in ACS Chemical Neuroscience, C&E News and other outlets

MJohnson photo Research done in the laboratory of Mike Johnson (Associate Professor of Chemistry) on ‘chemobrain’, a neurological condition caused by the use of cancer chemotherapy agents, was featured in Chemical and Engineering News and was published in the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, receiving an ACS Editors' Choice award and being featured on the journal's cover. Patients with 'chemobrain' often have deficits in long and short term memory as well as processing speed. Johnson’s team used sophisticated electrochemical measurements in rats treated with carboplatin, a commonly used chemotherapy agent, to determine that the release of dopamine and serotonin, neurotransmitters involved in cognition, motor control, and addiction, are diminished even though overall levels within the brain are unchanged.

Free access to the full text of the ACS Chemical Neuroscience article is available via PubMed Central.


May 2016: Bob Dunn receives KU Proof of Concept Fund award

Dunn photoBob Dunn, Professor of Chemistry, is the recipient of a $40,000 Proof of Concept Fund award from KU Innovation and Collaboration for his project on Scanning Resonator Microscopy (SRM). The project aims to develop a new SRM instrument as an analytical tool for biosensing of molecules binding to cell receptors in label free assays, which will be useful in the life science and materials analysis fields. KU Innovation and Collaboration's Proof of Concept funds are awarded to KU faculty and staff for the development of novel applied technologies that have near-term potential for licensing and commercialization within three years of funding.

More information about Dunn's project and the other Proof of Concept Fund awards given by KU Innovation and Collaboration this year can be found the KU News release


March 9, 2016: Tufts University Professor receives Ralph N. Adams Award

David R. Walt, University Professor of Chemistry at Tufts University, was awarded the Ralph N. Adams Award in Bioanalytical Chemistry at Pittcon in Atlanta on March 9, 2016. The Adams Award, sponsored by the Pittsburgh Conference and Friends of Ralph N. Adams, was established in 2005 to honor an outstanding scientist who has advanced the field of bioanalytical chemistry through research, innovation and/or education.

The Walt Laboratory at Tufts University is world-renowned for its pioneering work in fiber-optic microarray technology which is used in solving urgent biological problems such as the detection of infectious diseases, diagnostics for cancer biomarkers and in answering fundamental questions on basic biological processes such as enzymology and protein folding.

In addition to serving as University Professor at Tufts, Dr. Walt is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute professor and the founding director of the Tufts Institute for Innovation. He has also founded, to date, three companies spanning an array of special­ties: Illumina (genomics) in 1996; Quanterix (diagnostics) in 2007; and Ultivue (microscopy) in 2015.

Photo Credits and Copyright Notice: 2016 Roy Engelbrecht – royephoto.com

December 9, 2015: Steven Soper joins KU Chemistry as Foundation Distinguished Professor

Steven Soper, professor in the departments of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (UNC), has been named KU's 10th Foundation Distinguished Professor. Soper is a leading international researcher in developing new technologies that have important applications for disease detection, as well as a KU alumnus. He will return to KU’s Department of Chemistry on July 1, 2016, and hold an appointment in the Department of Mechanical Engineering as well.

More details can be found in the KU News release.


November 17, 2015: Dublin City University honors Craig Lunte

Craig Lunte photoOn November 17, a research symposium, memorial mass and dinner were held at Dublin City University (DCU) in Dublin, Ireland in remembrance of KU Chemistry Professor Craig Lunte. The symposium, entitled "Strengthening bonds through chemistry collaborations", reflected on the importance of the joint collaborations of KU and DCU in the analytical research community for both universities. Speakers included KU Chemistry faculty Sue Lunte, Bob Dunn and Brian Laird. A memorial mass followed the symposium with an address by DCU President Prof. Brian MacCraith and a eulogy by Brian Laird. A dinner was held in honor of Craig Lunte that evening.


July 4, 2015: Sarah Wildgen selected to attend 65th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

Sarah Wildgen, a graduate student in Bob Dunn's research group, Sarah Wildgen was selected to attend the 65th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting in Lindau, Germany June 28—July 3, 2015. The week-long meeting brought together 650 young researchers from 88 countries to interact with 70 Nobel Laureates from the fields of physiology and medicine, physics and chemistry. At this interdisciplinary meeting, Wildgen had the opportunity to learn from and interact with the Nobel Laureates through lectures, panel discussions and master classes, as well as closed door discussions on topics of the students’ choices (career and scientific advice, etc.).

Wildgen’s favorite talks included one by Dr. Oliver Smithies, 2007 Nobel Prize winner in Physiology and Medicine, who showed pictures of his lab notebook pages from 1950 to just last year, and also talked about how proud he was of publishing a paper as first author at the age of 90. She also really enjoyed Dr. William E. Moerner's talk (2014 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry) which included a fluorescence demonstration on stage. Wildgen later had the opportunity to meet Dr. Moerner as they traveled to Mainau Island for the closing ceremony on July 3.


March 11, 2015: Scripps Research Institute Professor receives Ralph N. Adams Award

John R. Yates III, the Ernest W. Hahn Professor in the Department of Chemical Physiology and Molecular and Cellular Neurobiology at The Scripps Research Institute, was awarded the Ralph N. Adams Award in Bioanalytical Chemistry at Pittcon in New Orleans on March 11, 2015. The Adams Award, sponsored by the Pittsburgh Conference and Friends of Ralph N. Adams, was established in 2005 to honor an outstanding scientist who has advanced the field of bioanalytical chemistry through research, innovation and/or education.

Yates’ research interests include development of integrated methods for tandem mass spectrometry analysis of protein mixtures, bioinformatics using mass spectrometry data, and biological studies involving proteomics. He is the lead inventor of the SEQUEST software for correlating tandem mass spectrometry data to sequences in the database and developer of the shotgun proteomics technique for the analysis of protein mixtures. His laboratory has developed the use of proteomic techniques to analyze protein complexes, posttranslational modifications, organelles and quantitative analysis of protein expression for the discovery of new biology.


February 12, 2015: Senior Ryan Limbocker receives Gates Cambridge Scholar

Limbocker photoRyan Limbocker, an undergraduate researcher and a senior majoring in chemistry, has been named a Gates Cambridge Scholar. The scholarship was established in 2000 by a donation from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom. Upon graduation from KU this May, Limbocker will have the opportunity to pursue his doctorate in analytical chemistry under the direction of Christopher Dobson, the John Humphrey Plummer Professor of Chemical and Structural Biology at Cambridge. He plans to research the fundamental origins of neurodegeneration, focusing on post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment, Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

Limbocker's faculty mentors in Chemistry are Mike Johnson, Mikhail Barybin and Tim Jackson.

For more information about the scholarship, please see the article in KU News.


February 11, 2015: "Lab on a chip" research highlighted in 2015 KU Chancellor's Report

Yong Zeng photoThe research of Yong Zeng, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, and Andrew Godwin, Chancellors Distinguished Chair in Biomedical Sciences and Endowed Professor at KU Medical Center, has been featured in the "Discover" tab of the 2015 Chancellor's Report from the University of Kansas. Section #4 in that tab (titled "Cellular reception") highlights their efforts in "creating a byte-sized biomedical testing device" that could be used to detect cancer sooner and in a less invasive way, ultimately increasing patients' survival rates. Recently, Profs. Godwin and Zeng received a $640,000 NIH grant from the National Cancer Institute to refine the "lab on a chip" technology.

Initial efforts were focused on using the chip to detect lung cancer, but now ovarian cancer is a possibility. Eventually, they hope that these chips can be used beyond the scope of detecting cancer and be adapted to detect other diseases.

The entire Chancellor's Report is accessible via the Office of the Chancellor's website.


February 9, 2015: George Wilson named 2015 Electrochemistry Award recipient by ACS Analytical Division

George Wilson photo

George Wilson is the 2015 recipient of the Award in Electrochemistry presented by the American Chemical Society's Division of Analytical Chemistry (ACS-DAC). Prof. Wilson, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Chemistry and former associate vice provost for research at the University of Kansas, focused his research on developing a blood glucose sensor for patients with diabetes that can be injected under the skin. His research interests include the development of new analytical protocol for accurate sample measurement, biosensors and biological recognition, and post-translational modifications of proteins.

The recipient of the ACS-DAC Award in Electrochemistry receives a plaque and $2500. Wilson joins 25 other recipients of this award since 1988, including Ralph "Buzz" N. Adams in 1989 and Ted Kuwana in 1995. The award is given to someone who has advanced the field of electrochemical analysis in one or more of the following ways:

  • Conceptualization and development of unique instrumentation that has made a significant impact on the field. 
  • Development of novel and important instrumentation. 
  • Elucidation of fundamental events or processes important to the field. 
  • Authorship of important research papers and/or books that have had an influential role in the development of the field.
  • Role in the use of chemical instrumentation.

More information about the ACS-DAC Award in Electrochemistry, please visit the ACS website.


2014 News

November 20, 2014: Tim Jackson receives award for teaching excellence, finalist for H.O.P.E. Award

Tim Jackson photo

Tim Jackson, Associate Professor of Chemistry, was honored with a 2014 Outstanding Educator Award at halftime of the Nov. 14, 2014 KU men’s basketball game. This is an annual award given by KU's chapter of Mortar Board, a national honor society, to recognize teaching excellence in the classroom.  Six awards total were presented in 2014.

Mortar Board is a national honor society that recognizes college seniors for superior achievement in scholarship, leadership and service.  Currently, there are 47 active student members of KU’s chapter. The Outstanding Educator Award is determined by nominations given to the KU chapter each year.

Prof. Jackson was also a 2014 H.O.P.E. Award finalist and recognized at the KU football game on Nov. 15.  Established by the Class of 1959, the H.O.P.E. (Honor for an Outstanding Progressive Educator) Award recognizes outstanding teaching and concern for students. It is the only KU award for teaching excellence bestowed exclusively by students and is led by the Board of Class Officers. The winner is selected by the senior class members.


November 10, 2014: Craig Lunte named recipient of 2014 Higuchi-KU Endowment Research Achievement Award

Craig Lunte photo

Congratulations to Craig Lunte, Professor of Chemistry, for being named a 2014 Higuchi-KU Endowment Research Achievement Award recipient!   Prof. Lunte is receiving the Dolph Simons Award in Biomedical Sciences in recognition of his exceptional work in the field of microdialysis sampling, especially the study of transdermal drug delivery and other translational uses of the technique.

Prof. Lunte is one of only four faculty members statewide receiving the annual Higuchi awards, which are the state's most prestigious awards for scholarly excellence. This year's other recipients are Victor Bailey, Charles W. Battey Distinguished Professor of Modern British History, KU; Susan J. Brown, University Distinguished Professor of Biology, K-State; and Frank F. White, professor of plant pathology, K-State.

For more information about the award, see the complete KU News release.


August 4, 2014: Shenqiang Ren receives Army Research Office Young Investigator Award

Shenqiang Ren photo

Shenqiang Ren, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has earned an Army Research Office Young Investigator Award grant to conduct research on cutting-edge photovoltaic technology intended to give American forces tactical advantages in the field. His work focuses on materials chemistry, synthesis and self-assembly of low-dimensional nanomaterials.

For more, see this KU News release.

 


May 30, 2014: Yong Zeng receives J.R. & Inez Jay Fund award

Yong Zeng photo

Yong Zeng, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded a J.R. & Inez Jay Fund Award through the Higuchi Biosciences Center (HBC). Prof. Zeng’s proposal is entitled "Microfluidic Molecular Analysis of Tumor-Derived Exosomes". The objective of this proposal is to develop novel microstructured functional materials for high-performance microfluidic isolation and molecular profiling of circulating exosomes in cancer.

 


March 25, 2014: Ryan Limbocker wins Goldwater Scholarship

Congratulations to Ryan Limbocker, junior from Overland Park, who has been awarded a prestigious Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship. The awards are the nation’s premier undergraduate award to honor academically gifted students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Ryan has been active in Professor Michael Johnson’s research group in the Department of Chemistry and the University Honors Program. He plans to pursue a doctorate in analytical chemistry and research the fundamental origins of neurodegeneration, focusing on post-chemotherapy cognitive impairment, Huntington’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. - See more about the award and the other students receiving Honorable Mentions at KU News.

 


March 10, 2014: Zhikai Zhu wins ACS Division of Analytical Chemistry Graduate Fellowship

The American Chemical Society (ACS) Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC) awarded Zhikai Zhu, a Ph.D. candidate in the Desaire Group of the chemistry department, a Summer Graduate Fellowship of 2014. This award is sponsored by the Eastman Chemical Company.

The ACS-DAC Graduate Fellowship Program is designed to encourage research in analytical chemistry, to promote the growth of the discipline, and to provide recognition of future leaders in the field of analytical chemistry. Applicants must demonstrate outstanding research ability and accomplishment, as evidenced by peer-reviewed publications in analytical chemistry.

Zhikai’s research focuses on the development of high-throughput analytical methods for glycopeptide analysis, and he uses the techniques to analyze the glycosylation of HIV envelope proteins, in order to gain insight on how glycosylation impacts HIV vaccine efficacy.


March 5, 2014: Michigan Professor receives Ralph N. Adams Award

Mark E. Meyerhoff, the Philip J. Elving Collegiate Professor of Chemistry at the University of Michigan, was awarded the Ralph N. Adams Award in Bioanalytical Chemistry at Pittcon in Chicago on March 5, 2014. Meyerhoff's analytical chemistry research interests are in creating ion-, gas-, and bio-selective electrochemical sensors suitable for measurements of clinically important analytes. He and his collaborators have published more than 330 papers describing this research.

The Adams Award, sponsored by the Pittsburgh Conference and Friends of Ralph N. Adams, was established in 2005 to honor an outstanding scientist who has advanced the field of bioanalytical chemistry through research, innovation and/or education. A complete list of award winners can be found on the Adams Institute's webpage.


January 06, 2014: Adams Students honored for research posters, presentations at bioscience symposium

One graduate student and two undergraduates from the Adams Institute were among eighteen undergraduate, graduate and postdoctoral students honored for their scientific research presentations at the 12th annual Kansas IDeA (Institutional Development Awards) Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (K-INBRE) symposium Jan. 18-19, 2014. 

The annual symposium is part of the K-INBRE initiative to identify and recruit promising college science students into careers in biomedical research in Kansas. Led by KU Medical Center, 10 campuses in Kansas and northern Oklahoma are a part of this collaborative network.

The following Adams students received cash prizes for their presentations.

Rachel Gehringer
doctoral student in chemistry, Mike Johnson Group
“Measurements of serotonin release in Huntington’s disease model R6/2 mice,” poster presentation.

 

 

Ryan Limbocker
junior in chemistry, Mike Johnson Group
“Neurochemical analysis of Chemobrain,” poster presentation.

 

 

Mitchell Newton photoMitchell Newton
sophomore in chemistry, Craig Lunte Group
“Utilization and development of methods for the analysis of brain dialysis to understand oxidative stress,” oral presentation.

 

For more, see this KU News release.


2013 News

October 28, 2013: Joe Siegel Named 2013 Self Fellow

Congratulations to Joe Siegel, from the Sue Lunte group, who was named one of 6 graduate students to receive the Madison and Lila Self Graduate Fellowship at KU as they begin the 2013-2014 academic year. This is a very prestigious honor and we are proud of Joe! For more, see this KU News release.


October 25, 2013: Sue Lunte Chosen One of 100 Top Analytical Scientists

Congratulations to Sue Lunte, Ralph N. Adams Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, for being named one of the 100 most influential analytical scientists in the world. Dr. Lunte is one of only six women named to the list. Read more about the other professionals named to the list by The Analytical Scientist, an international publication.


October 1, 2013: Sue Lunte Contributes to "Tips for Publishing" Video

Sue Lunte is featured in the opening segment of a recently produced video from the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC). The video features top tips from world-leading scientists and Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) staff on how to write and publish a great scientific paper.  Sue recently finished a 3-year term as Associate Editor for Analytical Methods, one of the newest of RSCs numerous scientific journals.  She is currently Editor-in-Chief of the journal.

View the You-Tube video here.
Learn more about RSC Publishing here.


August 7, 2013: Shenqiang Ren receives multiple grants, journal cover

Shenqiang Ren photo

Special recognition needs to be made for one of our newest faculty members, Shenqiang Ren. Dr. Ren had his NSF, DOE and ARPA-E grants all awarded this summer. It's an honor to receive an ARPA-E, as it's very competitive.

Dr. Ren, along with members of his research group, were also recent authors of a journal cover story for the July 5, 2013 edition of Advanced Materials.

Yu Xie, Maogang Gong, Tejas A. Shastry, Jessica Lohrman, Mark C. Hersam and Shenqiang Ren contributed the article Broad-Spectral-Response Nanocarbon Bulk-Heterojunction Excitonic Photodetectors (abstract) to Volume 25, Issue 25, pages 3433–3437 in Advanced Materials.

Read the KU News release here.

Channel 6 News article here.


August 1, 2013: Three KU Chemistry Professors named 2013 ACS Fellows

Congratulations to the three KU Chemistry Professors who have been named ACS Fellows by the American Chemical Society  for 2013. Susan Lunte, Ralph N. Adams Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Director of the Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry, Richard Schowen, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, and George Wilson, Professor Emeritus of Chemistry, will be feted along with the other 93 fellows at the society’s fall national meeting in Indianapolis this September, in a ceremony hosted by ACS Immediate Past-President Bassam Z. Shakhashiri.

“This is an honor bestowed on members for their outstanding accomplishments in scientific research, education, and public service,” said Shakhashiri in announcing the 2013 class of ACS Fellows. “Their individual contributions to ACS, to science, and to society are hallmarks of distinction in keeping with the ACS mission of advancing the chemical enterprise and its practitioners for the benefit of Earth and its people. Selection as an ACS Fellow greatly honors each individual and also honors ACS. It is also a charge to each fellow to maintain his or her excellence in advancing chemistry and serving society.”

The three join four other KU Chemistry Professors, Kristin Bowman-James, Joe Heppert, Ted Kuwana and Daryle Busch, who were named ACS Fellows in previous years.  The fellows program began in 2009 as a way to recognize and honor ACS members for outstanding achievements in and contributions to science, the profession, and ACS.  For further details and a list of the other ACS Fellows, please click here.


May 3, 2013: Erin Evans and Mitchell Newton win summer UGRA Awards

Two undergraduate researchers have won Undergraduate Research Awards (UGRA) that will fund their research during the summer of 2013.   Erin Evans in the Sue Lunte Group and Mitchell Newton in the Craig Lunte Group received awards for $1,000 each. These awards are provided each year by the Center for Undergraduate Research. Congratulations Erin and Mitchell!


April 29, 2013: David Weis awarded NIH COBRE Pilot Project Grant

David Weis photo

Professor David Weis, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) Pilot Project Grant through the Center for Cancer Experimental Therapeutics (CCET).  Prof. Weis’s proposal is entitled " Proteome-scale discovery of ligands targeting ezrin, an osteosarcoma target."  The objective of this proposal is to develop new isotope-exchange assay to discover drug-like molecules targeting cancer-related proteins.


April 26, 2013: Yong Zeng awarded NIH COBRE Pilot Project Grant

Yong Zeng photo

Professor Yong Zeng, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) Pilot Project Grant through the Center for Cancer Experimental Therapeutics (CCET).  Prof. Zeng’s proposal is entitled "High-throughput glynomic profiling in ovarian cancer using integrated microfluidic lectin arrays." The objective of this proposal is to develop new microfluidic approaches for exploring glycomic fingerprints of ovarian cancer to advance the early detection and personalized treatment of the disease.


April 15, 2013: Shenqiang Ren awarded NSF EPSCoR First Award

Shenqiang Ren PhotoProfessor Shenqiang Ren, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded an $80,000 Kansas National Science Foundation (NSF) EPSCoR First Award for his proposal "Multifunctional Copolymeric Photovoltaics." First Awards are competitive research development grants made to early career faculty at research universities within the state of Kansas through the Experimental Program to Stimulation Competitive Research (EPSCoR).  Congratulations to Prof. Ren!


April 2, 2013: Professor Desaire to be featured at the University Research & Entrepreneurship Symposium

Heather Desaire photoProfessor Heather Desaire along with Dr. Melinda Toumi will be featured at the University Research & Entrepreneurship Symposium, one of the nation's most exclusive venture capital events. The symposium, which will be Wednesday, April 3, in Cambridge, Mass., is designed to introduce a select group of cutting-edge university technologies to investors and entrepreneurs, with the goal of securing funding for new startup companies and converting university technologies into new products and cures.

Dr. Desaire's research includes analyzation of glycoproteins and small organic molecules impacting human health hormone therapies in addition to identifying disease markers. Additional infomation about her research and the research team can be found at the Heather Desaire Research Group webpage.

To read more about the Symposium as well as the other KU Professor that will be presenting, check the KU Today News .


March 29, 2013: Rachel Saylor Winner of 75th Anniversary Poster Award

Rachel Saylor photoRachel Saylor, a graduate student in the Sue Lunte Group, has received a $500 travel award to the 246th American Chemical Society National Meeting and Exposition in Indianapolis.  Rachel's poster was selected as a winner of a contest celebrating the 75th anniversary of the ACS Division of Analytical Chemistry. Congratulations to Rachel for her exemplary research work!


March 20, 2013: North Carolina Distinguished Professor Receives Ralph N. Adams Award

Michael Ramsey photoJ. Michael Ramsey, Minnie N. Goldby Distinguished Professor of Chemistry Chair at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, was awarded the Ralph N. Adams Award in Bioanalytical Chemistry at PITTCON 2013 in Philadelphia. The Award is sponsored by the Pittsburgh Conference and Friends of Ralph N. Adams. The Adams Award was established in 2005 to honor an outstanding scientist who has advanced the field of bioanalytical chemistry through research, innovation, and/or education.

Dr. Ramsey's's present research interests include microfabricated chemical instrumentation, micro- and nanofluidics, single molecule DNA sequencing, single cell assays, point-of-care clinical diagnostic devices, and highly miniaturized mass spectrometry.

For a list of all Adams Award recipients, see the Adams Award page.


March 1, 2013: Chemistry Student named to the University Scholars Program

Mitchell Newton photoThe University Scholars Program has announced the 32nd class of students, naming Mitchell Newton, Overland Park, a sophomore in chemistry to the program. Mitchell is a member of the Craig Lunte Group.  Administrated by the University Honors Program, this competitive opportunity is for students selected on the basis of academic credentials, commitment to their education, intellectual promise and evaluations by instructors, advisers and other faculty members. Students in their second year at KU with a 3.75 cumulative grade-point average were invited to apply.

For additional information and a complete list of all Scholars, please see the KU Today News.


February 14, 2013: Sue Lunte Group Student Wins Travel Award

Dulan Gunasekara photoThe Society for Electroanalytical Chemistry has named Dulan Gunasekara as a recipient of a SEAC Student Travel Award for the 2013 Pittcon. Dulan is working in Susan Lunte research group and developing novel analytical methodologies to detect reactive nitrogen and oxygen species produced in cells using microchip electrophoresis with electrochemical and fluorescence detection. Dulan will present a talk titled “Detection and Identification of Reactive Nitrogen Species using Microchip Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection” at Pittcon 2013.


January 4, 2013: Rachel Lane is Sigma Xi Grant Recipient

Rachel Lane PhotoRachael Lane, chemistry graduate student, is a recipient of an October 2012 Sigma Xi Grant-in-Aid of Research. These grants are highly competitive, with only 20% of applications being funded. The grant will provide research supplies for an investigation into the “fate of BPA and BADGE leached from epoxy coatings into drinking water.” Results will complement and be incorporated into those of a larger project funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through a grant (STAR Grant #834865) to the Water Research Foundation and KU. Rachael is working under the supervision of Dr. Craig Adams (adjunct member of the chemistry faculty); he and environmental engineering professors Steve Randtke and Ted Peltier are co-PIs on the EPA project.


Do you have an item of news that you would like to share with friends of the Adams Institute? E-mail short articles or links to adamsinstitute@ku.edu.

2012 News

December 27, 2012: Erin Reid Receives Undergraduate Research Award

Erin Reid photoErin Reid, senior chemistry major and member of the Sue Lunte Research Group, has been awarded a Undergraduate Research Award from the Center for Undergraduate Research.  Erin’s research project is titled "Separation optimization of L-DOPA and its metabolites using microchip electrophoresis with electrochemical detection".  She will receive $1,000 to support her in her research.  Congratulations to Erin for this recognition of her achievements in research!


October 15, 2012: Sue Lunte Group Students win FACCS Award for Poster Presentation

Congratulations to Sue Lunte Group students Jessica Creamer and Dulan Gunasekara who received awards from the Federation of Analytical Chemistry and Spectroscopy Societies (FACCS) for their posters presented at the SciX conference in Kansas City, Sept. 3- - Oct. 5, 2012.


September 10, 2012: Molecular Analysis of  Disease Pathways Focus of New KU Research Center

Sue Lunte photoA new $11 million, five-year grant will enable University of Kansas researchers on the Lawrence campus to better understand the molecular basis of diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s.

Funding from the National Institutes of Health will create a Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE): the Center for the Molecular Analysis of Disease Pathways. The grant was awarded to Susan Lunte, the Ralph N. Adams Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry and director of the Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry.

Follow this link for the complete KU News release.
Follow this link for a Wellness Commons/ Journal World article.


July 16, 2012: Heather Desaire Receives NIH R01 Grant

Heather Desaire photoCongratulations to Professor Heather Desaire for her successful proposal for a $1.38 million R01 grant from National Institute of Health.The project grant is titled "Characterization of PTMs on Env to support HIV vaccine development."


July 1, 2012: David Weis is Latest Receipient of  NSF CAREER Award

David Weis PhotoThe recent discovery of functional proteins that are intrinsically disordered, that is, lacking a well-defined structure, has challenged our understanding of protein function. However, the extent to which disordered states persist in the crowded conditions within a cell is still not understood. Professor David Weis has been awarded a five-year, $677,000 CAREER award from the National Science Foundation to address this issue. The Weis lab will develop new mass spectrometry-based methods to probe protein structure under crowded conditions and answer the question "Does crowding stabilize intrinsically disordered proteins?” The grant will also support the development of an introductory course in biomolecular structure by Prof. Weis. Follow this link for the complete KU Press release.


June 19, 2012: Craig Lunte Receives NIH Grant to Study Oxidative Stress

Craig Lunte  photoMore than 3 million Americans live with epilepsy, the chronic neurological disorder that brings on recurrent seizures. One of the most overlooked but damaging aspects of epileptic seizures is oxidative stress to cells in the brain. With a new $1.2 million, four-year grant from the National Institutes of Health, Professor Craig Lunte and collaborator Dr. Ivan Osorio from KU Medical Center are looking at focal seizures in specific brain regions such as the hippocampus, to shed light on chemical and electrophysiological changes in the brain tied to the seizures. Follow this link for the complete KU Press release.


April 16, 2012: Rachel Saylor Receives NSF Honorable Mention

Rachel Saylor photoCongratulations to Rachel Saylor, Chemistry graduate student and member of the Sue Lunte Research Group who received an honorable mention for the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowships. NSF fellowship recipients as well as honorable mentions represent the best among young scientists in the United States. Follow this link for the complete KU Press release.


April 3, 2012: Adams Undergraduate Wins Goldwater Award

Rodi Torres PhotoA chemistry undergraduate student in the Cindy Berrie Research Group, Rodi M. Torres-Gavosto, has been chosen as one of four KU recipients of the prestigious Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships. The awards are the premier undergraduate recognition to honor academically gifted students. Upon completing a bachelor’s in chemistry, Rodi plans to obtain a doctorate and begin a career as a professor of chemistry, focusing on research in nanomaterials.. Follow this link for the complete KU Press release.


March 27, 2012: Adams Graduate Students Receive Research Competition Awards

Caitlin Schupp PhotoThe Office of Research and Graduate Studies and Sigma Xi Honorary Society have announced that Caitlin Schupp and Dulan Gunasekara, graduate students in the Sue Lunte Group, will receive awards for the 2012 Graduate Student Research Competition. Caitlin will receive a $250 Research Award from Research and Graduate Studiies for her poster titled "Method Development for the Determination of Neurotransmitters in C. Elegans via Capillary Electrophoresis coupled to Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection (CE-LIF)". In addition to Caitlin, the authors included Tom Linz and Sue Lunte, and Raymond Caylor.

Dulan Gunasekara PhotoDulan was awarded First Place for Advanced Graduate Students in the Sigma Xi Research Paper Competition, which was run concurrently with the RGS competition. The title of Dulan's oral presentation was "Microchip Electrophoresis Based Methods to Monitor Cellular Nitric Oxide Production". The competition took place on March 7, 2012, in the Ballroom of the Kansas Union. Well done Caitlin and Dulan!
 


2011 News

October 26, 2011: Jonathan Sweedler Receives Ralph N. Adams Award

Jonathan Sweedler photoCongratulations to Professor Jonathan V. Sweedler, James R. Eiszner Family Chair in Chemistry at the University of Illinois, the 2012 receipient of the Ralph N. Adams Award. Dr.Sweedler is the director of the UIUC Biotechnology Center, and has appointments in the Neuroscience Program, the Department of Physiology and the Bioengineering Program. His research interests are in bioanalytical chemistry, and focus on new metabolomic and peptidomic technologies for assaying small volume samples.

The Ralph N. Adams Award was established in 2004 with funds raised from friends and former students of Ralph Adams. The award recognizes significant contributions to the field of bioanalytical chemistry, broadly defined. The recipient will have introduced a significant technique, theory, instrument or application important to the life sciences, and provided an exceptional environment to educate bioanalytical chemists. The award consists of a $2500 cash award and is celebrated with a half day symposia at Pittcon (travel costs paid by Pittcon).


August 22, 2011: Sarah Wildgen Receives Self Fellowship

Sarah Wildgen photoSarah Wildgen, doctoral student in the Bob Dunn research group, is one of eight recipients of KU's prestigious Madison and Lila Self Graduate Fellowship as she begins the 2011-2012 academic year.  Sarah is currently developing novel biosensors for multiplexed detection of biological samples with a goal of improving diagnostic capabilities for various forms of cancer. Wildgen received her B.S. in chemistry with a minor in mathematics (2009) from Drake University in Des Moines. Read more in this KU news release.


September 1, 2011: Ralph N. Adams featured in Ad Astra Scientist Trading Cards

Buzz Adams photoDuring 2011, the Ad Astra Initiative will be highlighting 150 Kansas scientists, both past and present, and their contributions, by providing free trading cards with information about Kansas scientists. The trading cards, geared towards teachers and students, can be downloaded in sets of four and printed for use in classrooms or at home. Set #1 in September features Ralph N. Adams. In addition to Buzz, featured scientists include Mario Rivera and Kristin Bowman James.


August 22, 2011: Graduate student awarded AHA Predoctoral Fellowship

Tom Linz photoTom Linz of the Sue Lunte group was recently awarded a predoctoral fellowship from the American Heart Association for his work regarding the development of an analytical method for the determination of methylated arginines (MAs) in serum. MAs have been shown to inhibit in vivo production of nitric oxide (NO). Inadequate amounts of NO can disrupt normal function of the vasculature, which could ultimately cause the onset of various cardiovascular pathologies.

The goal of Tom’s project is to determine whether the concentrations of MAs in serum can be used as biomarkers to predict the progression of coronary atherosclerosis in at-risk patients. Tom has already made substantial progress towards the development of both capillary and microchip electrophoresis methods to measure the concentrations of MAs. Once these methods are validated, they will be applied to the analysis of clinical samples provided by Adams lab alum, Roger Dreiling, MD. Dr. Dreiling is the Director of Interventional Cardiology at Lawrence Memorial Hospital and is aiding this project by providing clinically relevant blood samples from patients undergoing testing for coronary atherosclerosis. His enthusiasm in establishing a research collaboration with KU has allowed this project to really take shape.

The working hypothesis is that patients who are diagnosed with atherosclerosis via coronary angiography will have elevated levels of MAs. If a positive correlation is determined, the long-term goal of this project would be to implement this assay in routine blood screenings in order to diagnose patients with cardiovascular disease. Having current and former members of the Adams lab family work to interface analytical chemistry with clinical patient care to help advance disease diagnostics is a great tribute to Ralph Adams’ legacy.


August 1, 2011: Pharmaceutical Chemistry hires new faculty with Bioanalytical Chemistry research interests

The Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry is excited to announce that they have hired two outstanding new faculty members, Tom Tolbert and Michael Wang. Both of these researchers will be working closely with researchers in the Adams Institute, since their research areas are closely related to bioanalytical chemistry.

Tom Tolbert photoDr. Tolbert will join the Department as Associate Professor in June 2011. Dr. Tolbert comes from Indiana University in Bloomington. He obtained his Ph.D. in Biochemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and received his post-doctoral training at The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, CA. Dr. Tolbert’s research interests are in the area of glycopeptide and glycoprotein synthesis, glycoprotein function, and antibody-dependent immune response. Our new colleagues will occupy laboratory and office space in the Simons Research Laboratories.

Michael Wang photoDr. Wang will join the Department as Assistant Professor in August 2011. Dr. Wang comes from the University of North Carolina, where he has received his post-doctoral training and has spent three years as Research Assistant Professor in the Division of Pharmacotherapy and Experimental Therapeutics (DPET) at the Eshelman School of Pharmacy. He obtained his Ph.D. in analytical chemistry from Duke University in North Carolina. Dr. Wang’s research interests are in the area of drug metabolism, the cytochrome P450 family of enzymes, quantitative proteomics and general bioanalytical chemistry.


April 2, 2011: Undergraduate researcher wins Sigma Xi award

Rudy Torres-Gavosto photoRodi Torres-Gavosto, an undergraduate student in the Cindy Berrie research group, placed third in the undergraduate student category of the Sigma Xi research competition held on April 2nd. This scientific society was established in 1886, and is dedicated to supporting science, technology, and engineering. Their motto is “Spoudon Xynones” which means “Companions in Zealous Research”. The University of Kansas has had a Sigma Xi chapter since the very beginning, and was the fourth chapter to be established.


February 25, 2011: Ted Kuwana and one of his graduate students, Steve Soper, receive ACS Analytical Divison awards

Ted Kuwana photoTed Kuwana (Ph.D. 1959), Emeritus Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at KU, received the Award for Distinguished Service in the Advancement of Analytical Chemistry for 2011. This award is given annually to an individual who has substantially and uniquely enhanced the field of analytical chemistry. Dr. Kuwana was Buzz Adams’ first graduate student, and has been instrumental in the founding of the Adams Institute.
In addition, Dr. Kuwana has been designated as an ACS Fellow for 2011. This honor recognizes his significant contributions to the science and for providing excellent service to the ACS. Follow this link for a slide show of photos from the event.

Steve Soper photoSteve Soper (Ph.D. 1989), Senn Professor of Chemistry at Louisiana State University, received the Division's Award in Chemical Instrumentation. This award is given annually for advancing the field of analytical chemistry through developments in chemical instrumentation. Dr. Soper is the Director of the Center for BioModular Multi-Scale Systems at LSU and has received many awards and honors for his contributions to Analytical Chemistry. Congratulations to Drs. Kuwana and Soper for these richly deserved awards.


2010 News

December 6, 2010: Sue Lunte Group Student wins Academic Travel Award

Tom Linz photo

Tom Linz recently received the Tony B. Academic Travel Award to present a poster on his research at Lab Automation 2011. Tom has spent the last two years developing a capillary electrophoresis-based method for the analysis of methylated arginines (MAs) in human plasma. MAs have vasoconstrictive effects in vivo and have been implicated in various cardiovascular diseases and respiratory disorders. The goal of this research is to develop a high-throughput method that can screen the blood of patients with and without coronary atherosclerosis to help determine if a definite correlation exists between the concentrations of MAs and the progression of the disease state. Tom is excited to get the opportunity to present the recent advances in this project in beautiful southern California in January.


November 18, 2010: REU Student Receives Poster Award

Christa Snyder photo

Christa Snyder, a Summer 2010 Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) student in the Sue Lunte Group, has been selected as the winner of the 2011 Analytical Sciences Digital Library/Association for Lab Automation (ASDL-ALA) Young Scientist Poster Award. This award is sponsored by the ALA and recognizes a student poster submitted to the ASDL e-Poster session pertaining to laboratory automation. Christa will receive $500 and travel costs to attend LabAutomation 2011 in Palm Springs, California (January 29-February 2, 2011) to present her poster. She will also submit a manuscript based on her poster to the Journal of Laboratory Automation (JALA).


November 10, 2010: Visiting Researcher Wins Prestigious Award for Thesis

Wendell Coltro photo

Wendell Karlos Tomazelli Coltro, a past visiting graduate researcher with the Sue Lunte Group, has won “The Best Chemistry Thesis of 2008 Award”, offered by the Brazilian Government Agency CAPES. His work was chosen from among all theses finished in 2008 in Brazil. The thesis, entitled “Contactless conductivity detection: A new tool for monitoring biomolecular interactions” was based in part on experimental work done in the Sue Lunte Group lab at The University of Kansas. In addition to a diploma and a one year post-doctoral scholarship, Dr. Coltro will also receive a medal at a ceremony in December 2010. His advisor, Emanuel Carrilho (Institute of Chemistry of São Carlos, University of São Paulo, Brazil,) was also awarded funds for participation in a meeting or conference of his choice. Dr. Coltro was recently admitted to the faculty of University of Goias at Goiania, Brazil, where he is conducting research on microchip analysis systems.


July 1, 2010: Institute Undergraduate Conducts Research in Ireland

Emilie Mainz photo

Emilie Mainz, an Adams undergraduate researcher in the Sue Lunte Group, is visiting Cork, Ireland this summer to conduct research on biofuel cells. This visit is funded by the From Atoms to Systems Undergraduate Research Network, FASTNET, sponsored by the Tyndall National Institute. Her research project will focus on microfluidic biofuel cells. She is working with FASTNET researchers to make biofuel cells with enzymes to produce sustainable energy sources. These biofuel cells are incorporated with microfluidics, one of the major focuses of the Sue Lunte Group, and could power microelectronic devices in the future. Emilie’s Principal Investigator is Dr. Gregoire Herzog. In addition to her work, Emilie is taking time to do some sightseeing in Ireland. She has taken field trips to Dublin, nearby universities, a brewery and a zoo. For additional information, follow this link to Emilie’s blog.


June 1, 2010: Ralph Adams Alumni Gather for Symposium & Reunion

Ralph Adams photo

Former graduate students, undergraduate students, and postdoctoral researchers from across the nation who worked in the Ralph Adams Research Group at The University of Kansas returned to the KU campus this summer for a Research Symposium and Reunion. The Adams Group alumni were joined by friends and family for three days of research presentations, campus and facility tours, and social events. The Buzz Adams Legacy Symposium and Reunion took place on June 11-13, 2010, and welcomed over 40 guests who shared their current research activities and memories of their time in the Adams Lab, and renewed old friendships.

The symposium took place on Saturday, June 12, and featured presentations by a number of Adams alumni. Presenters included:

  • Mike Johnson, Assistant Professor of Chemistry, The University of Kansas. “High temporal resolution analytical measurements in living systems
  • Pete Kissinger, Professor of Chemistry, Purdue University. “Personalized Medicine; Automated Serial Blood Sampling for Clinical Drug Trials, NICUs and ICUs; Exploring Dried Biofluid Samples with DESI Mass Spectrometry”
  • Richard McCreery, Professor of Chemistry, Senior Research Officer, National Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Alberta. “Nonvolatile Memory from the World’s Thinnest Electro­chemical Cell (containing a carbon electrode, what else?)”
  • Terry Miller, Ohio Eminent Scholar, Professor of Physical Chemistry, The Ohio State University. “Free Radicals from the 1960’s into the 21st Century”
  • Margaret Rice, Professor, Departments of Neurosurgery & Physiology and Neuroscience, New York University. “Dopa­mine: Beyond the Synapse”
  • Mark Wightman, W.R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. “Neurochemical responses to rewarding and aversive stimuli”

Following the symposium, some of the attendees toured the offices and labs of the Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry, while others chose to visit the scenic KU campus. After dinner, the group gathered at the home of Gini Adams for a reception to conclude the day’s activities.

On Sunday morning, the participants took advantage of a final opportunity to reconnect with colleagues at a brunch in the historic Eldridge Hotel in downtown Lawrence before heading off to catch their various flights home. The last Adams Reunion was held in 2001, so there was quite a bit to catch up on at this gathering. All enjoyed this opportunity to connect with old friends and make new ones, and parted with a promise to meet again at a future, not too distant date. Follow this link for a slide show of photos from the Reunion.


May 8, 2010: Adams Undergraduates Receive Seo Research Scholarships

Two undergraduate researchers from Adams research groups were awarded the Seo Research Scholarships at the Chemistry Honors Banquet on May 8, 2010.  The Seo Research Scholarship, made possible through generous contributions from Eddie Tatsu Seo and Alice Yoshiko Seo and Research and Graduate Studies, provides scholarships of $2,000 to undergraduates who demonstrate dedication to exemplary scholarship and research in Analytical Chemistry.  The Seo Scholars for 2010 are Emilie Mainz, a member of the Sue Lunte Research Group, and Todd Coffey from the Mike Johnson Group.

Emilie Mainz

Emilie, a Goddard junior majoring in Biochemistry, is currently working with graduate researcher Courtney Kuhnline on separation of dynorphin peptides using capillary electrophoresis. Emilie plans to continue her education in graduate school following graduation. Her summer plans include a trip to Cork, Ireland to conduct research on biofuel cells.




 

Todd Coffey

Todd is a fifth year senior Neurobiology major from Topeka who came to KU in 2005.   Derek maintained a 3.89 unweighted GPA at Seaman High School. He will be conducting research full time during the summer of 2010 on merged behavioral and neurochemical analysis using cyclic voltammetry.  He has been accepted to graduate school at KU in Neuroscience.

Congratulations to Todd and Emilie for their exemplary work and dedication to their research efforts.



April 29, 2010: Graduate Researcher wins Sigma Xi Award

Anne Regel Photo

Anne Regel, a graduate student in the Susan Lunte research group, placed first in the advanced graduate student category of the Sigma Xi fraternity research competition held on April 24th. This scientific society was established in 1886, and is dedicated to supporting science, technology, and engineering. Their motto is “Spoudon Xynones” which means “Companions in Zealous Research”. The University of Kansas has had a Sigma Xi chapter since the very beginning, and was the fourth chapter to be established.



April 5, 2010: Graduate Students earn NSF GK-12 Fellowships

Two doctoral candidates from the Heather Desaire Research Team are participating in a National Science Foundation Graduate STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) in K-12 Education program. Fellows in this program receive $30,000 for 12 months plus tuition and travel expenses.

Offered jointly by KU’s Transportation Research Institute and Center for Science Education, the program supports the fellows — all future scientists and teachers of science, technology, engineering and mathematics — to improve their teaching and communication skills. The fellows work in partnership with middle schools to advance science, technology, engineering and mathematics education and to provide role models for younger students.

Katie Rebecchi Photo

Katie Rebecchi, one of eight 2009 fellows, received her bachelor’s degree from Northwest Missouri State University. Katie worked with Harry Purrington, a 7th grade Physical Science teacher at Arrowhead Middle School in Kansas City, Kansas, spending one day a week in his classroom as a scientist mentor helping him to develop student research. Katie will be graduating in the fall of 2010, and hopes to teach at the university level.

Carrie Woodin Photo

Carrie Woodin is one of 9 new fellows for the 2010-2011 academic year. She received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Illinois-Springfield. Carrie will attend the GK-12 Summer Academy this June with area teachers. At the completion of the Academy, teachers and students will form teams, and spend the next academic year working together. In addition, Carrie will spend four hours a week with undergraduates preparing to become teachers through a research methods class offered by the UKanTeach program at the University of Kansas. Carrie would also like to teach at the university level, and is interested in pursuing biomedical research applications. KU News Release


March 11, 2010: Heather Desaire Awarded Proof-of-Concept Grant

Heather Desaire Photo

Heather Desaire, Associate Professor of Chemistry and Adams Institute faculty member, has been awarded a proof-of-concept grant, one of 11 awarded to KU faculty. These grants are sponsored by KU's Institute for Advancing Medical Innovation (IAMI), a program funded by the Kauffman Foundation and KU Endowment. The goal of the program is to generate new and innovative drugs, medical devices, and drug- device combinations. The title of Dr. Desaire's proposal is "A Novel Platform for Producing Proteins". Oread Article



January 4, 2010: Adams Undergraduate Selected for K-INBRE Scholarship

Derek Jensen Photo

Undergraduates affiliated with the Adams Institute continue to demonstrate leadership and excellence in research, and to win recognition for these qualities. In the latest example, Derek Jensen, a researcher in the Sue Lunte group, was among eight KU students selected to receive Kansas IDEA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (K-INBRE) spring 2010 undergraduate scholarships.

“K-INBRE is a project funded by the National Institutes of Health that includes nine academic institutions in Kansas, including the University of Kansas. One of the goals of the K-INBRE program is to identify and recruit promising undergraduate science students into careers in biomedical research in Kansas. To help achieve this goal, the program has established the K-INBRE Undergraduate Scholarship Program at the University of Kansas to provide financial support and mentoring to promising undergraduate scholars.” (K-INBRE Website)

The scholarships will provide $2,000 for the spring and (contingent of funding) $4,000 for the summer. These funds can be used for any purpose that supports the recipient’s participation in research. In addition, K-INBRE scholars may also enroll in an undergraduate research course and obtain undergraduate credit for their research.

Derek is a sophomore biochemistry major from Gardner, and is an Honors student at KU. Derek maintained a 4.0 unweighted GPA in high school, and completed the Kansas Scholars Curriculum at Gardner Edgerton High School. In 2009, he was one of four recipients of a Seo Research Scholarship. He will be conducting research to culture macrophage cells and optimize parameters for the production of peroxynitrite by these cells.


2009 News

December 21, 2009: Adams Faculty, Students, and Postdocs Present at Pittcon 2010

Pittcon logo

The Adams Institute and the University of Kansas will be well represented at the Pittsburgh Conference (Pittcon) in Orlando, Florida, Feb. 28 - March 10, 2010. Pittcon is the world’s annual premier Conference and Exposition on laboratory science, and attracts nearly 20,000 attendees from industry, academia and government from 90 countries worldwide. The following Adams faculty, postdocs, and students will attend and make presentations:

Organized Contributed Sessions
  • "Enhanced Recombinant Protein Production Using a Novel, Invisible Purification Tag." Melinda L Toumi, University of Kansas, Jamie L Wenke, Jennifer S Laurence, Heather Desaire
  • "Development of A Microfluidic-Based Screening Device For Methylarginines In Infant Plasma." Thomas Linz, University of Kansas, Susan M Lunte
  • "Microanalytical Techniques for Pharmaceutically Relevant Neuropeptides." Courtney D Kuhnline, University of Kansas, Susan M Lunte
  • "A Microchip Electrophoresis Device for the Separation and Detection of Peroxynitrite From Macrophage Cells." Matthew K Hulvey, University of Kansas, Susan M Lunte
  • "Miniaturized Analytical System for Electrochemical Detection of NitriteiIn Biological Matrices." Anne Regel, University of Kansas, Susan M Lunte, Pradyot Nandi
  • "Teaching Concepts in Analytical Chemistry at the Introductory Graduate Level." Craig E Lunte, University of Kansas
Oral Sessions
  • "Glycopepgrader - A Tool for Deciphering Glycopeptide Compositions." Carrie L Woodin, University of Kansas, Kathryn R Rebecchi, Melinda L Toumi, Heather Desaire
Symposia
  • "Emerging Strategies for Facilitating Glycoprotein Analysis." Heather Desaire, University of Kansas
  • "Neurochemical Applications of Microchip Electrophoresis with Electrochemical Detection." Susan M Lunte, University of Kansas, Matthew K Hulvey, Anne Regel, David F Fischer, Thomas Linz, Ryan Grigsby
  • "Separation Based Sensors Incorporating Microdialysis Coupled to Microchip Electrophoresis." Susan M Lunte, University of Kansas, Pradyot Nandi, Dhara Desai, Anne Regel, Ryan Grigsby
Posters
  • "Analytical Methods for Understanding Relationships Between Neurochemical Signaling and Behavior." Michael A Johnson, University of Kansas, Gregory Osterhaus, Andrea N Ortiz, Kelli A Lauderdale, Stephen C Fowler
  • "The Disulfiram Metabolite Carbamathione: A New Pharmacological Tool in Alcohol and Cocaine Addiction." Swetha Kaul, University of Kansas, Craig E Lunte, Morris D Faiman, Todd D Williams
  • "Engineered Glycosylation for Protein Stability: Human Growth Hormone." Jamie L Wenke, University of Kansas, Melinda L Toumi, Heather Desaire, Kathryn R Rebecchi, Jennifer S Laurence
  • "Using Microdialysis Sampling to Study Inhibitors of 11ß-Hsd1 as Drug Candidates." Sara Thomas, University of Kansas, Craig E Lunte

November 12, 2009: Bob Dunn Honored as Outstanding Educator

Bob Dunn photo

Bob Dunn was one of five professors honored by the Mortar Board honor society as 2009 Outstanding Educator. The 2009 Outstanding Educators were introduced Friday, Nov. 13, during halftime of the KU-Hofstra University men’s basketball game at Allen Fieldhouse, and at a reception in the Malott Room in the Kansas Union on Sunday, Nov. 15.

Bob, who came to KU in 1995, has won several awards in recognition of his teaching and research. In 1997, he was named a national Searle scholar and received a National Science Foundation CAREER Award in recognition of his work as a teacher-scholar. In 2000, Dunn received a national Alfred P. Sloan fellowship and was named one of the first two Self Faculty Scholars appointed at KU. His research focuses on developing new microscopic techniques to study single biological molecules. Congratulations Dr. Dunn! KU News Release


September 1, 2009: Matt Hulvey Awarded AHA Postdoctoral Fellowship

Matt Hulvey photo

Matthew Hulvey, a postdoctoral researcher in Dr. Susan Lunte’s lab, recently received a postdoctoral fellowship from the American Heart Association – Midwest Affiliate.  Dr. Hulvey’s research project will focus on the development of a microfluidic device capable of separating and detecting peroxynitrite from single cells.   

Peroxynitrite is a reactive species, formed in vivo during proinflammatory events, that is linked to several cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases.  As peroxynitrite is highly reactive, it exhibits a half life of less than 1 second under physiological conditions.  Dr. Hulvey’s primary focus will be to find a method to stabilize peroxynitrite so that it can be separated and detected using microchip with electrochemical detection electrophoresis.  The single cell handling portion of the project will be carried out through collaboration between the Lunte lab and Dr. Chris Culbertson’s group at Kansas State University. 

Congratulations to Matt for his success in wining this prestigious postdoctoral fellowship!


July 16, 2009: MRB lauded for innovative design by architectural magazine

MRB at night

The Multidisciplinary Research Building, home of the Adams Institute, was recently awarded honorable mention for outstanding design and architecture in education by College Planning and Management magazine. .

The 106,000-square-foot building was dedicated in March 2006. It houses more than 175 faculty, students and research staff. The facility encourages collaboration among researchers of varying disciplines such as drug discovery and delivery, bioinformatics, chemistry, molecular bioscience and geology.

“The MRB serves a vital function as an anchor point at the edge of the campus, acting as a key component in fulfilling the vision of the West Campus Master Plan,” the article states. “Openness and transparency are valued by the university, and the building opens its arms and reaches toward the future campus promenade and distant views.” Read the entire news release.


June 3, 2009: Interdisciplinary group forms to investigate "Chemo-brain"

research technician photo

Cancer patients commonly report cognitive impairment as a result of the cancer or the cancer treatment. However, little is known about the cause or causes of this impairment, commonly called “chemo-brain”. Common deficits in cognitive function include memory and concentration, focus, reading comprehension, and ability to work with numbers.

A group of researchers from the KU campus and the KU Medical Center met recently to review the existing research and make plans to submit a National Institutes of Health Grand Opportunity Proposal to investigate chemo-brain. In this proposal, oncologists, neuroscientists and analytical chemists will team together to study the neurochemical basis of chemobrain toxicity, so that treatments can be developed that minimize or preclude this undesirable side effect of chemotherapy.

Participants from the Medical Center include:

  • Carol Fabian M.D., Professor of Medicine, Division of Clinical Oncology
  • Director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Center Kansas Masonic Cancer Research
  • Roy Jensen M.D., Director of the University of Kansas Cancer Center and Kansas Masonic Cancer Research Institute
  • Jennifer Klemp, Ph.D., MPH, Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Managing Director of the Breast Cancer Survivorship Center
  • Brian Petroff, DVM, Ph.D. , Scientific Director of the Breast Cancer Prevention Center Laboratory and Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine
  • William Brooks, Ph.D., Director of the Hoglund Brain Imaging Center and Professor of Neurology

Lawrence Campus participants include:

  • Craig Lunte, Ph.D., Professor of Chemistry and Courtesy Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry
  • Christian Schoeneich, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Michael Johnson, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Neuroscience
  • Stephen Fowler, Ph.D., Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Neuroscience
  • Derek Lindquist, Ph.D., Research Associate Department of Molecular Bioscience
 

May 27, 2009: REU Students Join Adams Research Groups

Undergraduates from across the US and Mexico have traveled to KU for a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU), and four have joined research groups in the Adams Institute. From now until August 4, 14 undergraduates will conduct research in chemistry, learn about career opportunities, and enjoy their time in Lawrence. Participants select individual research projects from more than 20 problems at the forefront of the chemical sciences and share their professional development experiences as a cohort. The cohort experiences include a variety of professional and social group activities that will contribute to each participant’s personal, collaborative, and professional growth. A key component is the newly designed career enhancement program addressing career opportunities and challenges in emerging interdisciplinary research. The four Adams REU interns include:

Kate Eschelman photo

Kate Eschelman, a senior from Olathe studying chemistry at Wagner College, will be working in the Heather Desaire Group to develop methods for rapid detection of cancer.

Maricarmen Pintado Gonzalez photo

Maricarmen Pintado Gonzalez, a senior from Villahermosa, Tabasco, Mexico majoring in Biotechnology at the Universidad Autónoma De Guadalajara, will working with the Mario Rivera Group to make mutations in the HasAp gene from the bacteria P. aeruginosa to study its action.

Brittney Ridl photo

Brittney Ridl, a junior from Dickinson, ND studying chemistry and mathematics at Dickinson State University will be working on the ATPase Project in the Berrie Group. She is attempting to form a monolayer on a surface, and position that protein on an etched out portion of the surface in the correct orientation and position.

Sara Wenzel photo

Sara Wenzel, a senior from Monmouth Illinois studying chemistry at Monmouth College will be working in the Mike Johnson Group to investigate the Da autoreceptor functionality in fragile-x mice.


May 9, 2009: Adams Undergraduates Receive Seo Research Scholarships

Four undergraduate researchers from Adams research groups were awarded the Seo Research Scholarships at the Chemistry Honors Banquet on May 9. The Seo Research Scholarship, made possible through generous contributions from Eddie Tatsu Seo and Alice Yoshiko Seo and Research and Graduate Studies, provides scholarships of $1,000 to undergraduates who demonstrate dedication to exemplary scholarship and research in Analytical Chemistry. The Seo Scholars for 2009 are Derek Jensen, a member of the Sue Lunte Research Group, Ben Kurth, Mike Johnson Group, Martin Jacques, David Weis Group, and Alan Schurle, Bob Dunn Research Group.

Derek Jensen photo

Derek is a freshman chemistry major from Gardner, and is an Honors student at KU. Derek maintained a 4.0 unweighted GPA in high school, and completed the Kansas Scholars Curriculum at Gardner Edgerton High School. He will be conducting research full time during the summer of 2009 to culture macrophage cells and optimize parameters for the production of peroxynitrite by these cells.

Ben Kurth photo

Ben is a junior cell biology major from Olathe. He graduated from Olathe Northwest High School with a cumulative unweighted grade point average of 3.85, and has maintained a 4.0 GPA at KU. Ben is a K-INBRE Scholar and a member of the Honors Program. He plans to earn a combined MD/PhD. from the University of Kansas Medical School. Ben will be working on combining the 'uncaging' of the neurotransmitter glutamate with fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV), a high-temporal resolution method.

Martin Jacques photo

Martin is a senior chemistry major who came to KU in 2006 from Fort Hays State University. He joined the Weis Research Group in August of 2008, and quickly established himself as an exemplary researcher. He expects to graduate in December of 2009. Over the summer, he will be testing and optimizing a new custom-built refrigerated LC system and evaluating its performance for H/D exchange experiments. His work will also include testing the digestion efficiency of pepsin reactor columns.

Alan Schurle photo

Alan is a Junior in Chemistry from Manhattan. During his time at KU he has maintained a 4.0 grade point average while participating in the Honors program, volunteering in a number of activities, and winning numerous awards. This summer he will be conducting research to understand the structure and dynamics of model lipid membranes. His goal is to complement single molecule measurements with high resolution NSOM measurements to provide a complementary view of membrane properties.


Congratulations to all four of the 2009 awardees for their exemplary work and dedication to their research efforts.


April 20, 2009: Heather Desaire Awarded Kemper Fellowship

Cindy BerrieHeather Desaire

Congratulations to Cindy Berrie and Heather Desaire, recipients of two of the 20 Kemper Fellowships for 2009! The Kemper fellowships recognize outstanding teachers and advisers at KU as determined by a seven-member selection committee. Now in their 14th year, the awards are supported by $650,000 in gifts from the William T. Kemper Foundation (Commerce Bank, trustee) and $650,000 in matching funds from KU Endowment.

Berrie’s tests are hard, and her classes challenging, but her students say she’s “awesome” and would have it no other way. Berrie joined the chemistry department in 2001 and was promoted to associate professor in 2007. She primarily has taught advanced undergraduate fundamental and laboratory courses, including honors courses, and currently is the department’s honors coordinator. KU News Release

“Professor Desaire listens to students … really listens and probes to understand the heart of the student’s question before constructing an answer,” said Joseph Heppert, chemistry department chair. Many of Desaire’s students go on to professional positions at major firms, evidence that the quality of her teaching is superb. KU News Release


April 14, 2009: Courtney Kuhnline Receives Schering-Plough Award

Courtney Kuhnline Photo

Courtney Danielle Kuhnline was awarded the Schering-Plough Science and Innovation Award for 2009. Courtney is a fourth year graduate student in Dr. Susan Lunte's laboratory. She has a B.S. in investigative medical science with an emphasis in chemistry. Courtney received her masters degree in pharmaceutical chemistry in January of 2008 and is a doctoral candidate in the same program.

Each year 13 students are recognized nationally with this distinction from Schering-Plough, a pharmaceutical company in Kenilworth, New Jersey. The award is based on scientific achievement and research progress towards the student's dissertation project as well as exemplary leadership abilities and communications skills. Courtney's research project is focused on the development of new analytical methodologies to investigate the metabolism of dynorphin, a neuropeptide, at the blood brain barrier. This peptide has been linked to numerous neurological disorders including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's disease, and neuropathic pain. In particular she will be developing an immunoaffinity microchip electrophoresis method to study dynorphin metabolism in vitro.


March 6, 2009: Jamie Wenke Receives Undergraduate Research Award and K-INBRE Award of Excellence

Jaime Wenke Photo

An undergraduate researcher affiliated with the Adams Institute is among the sixty-nine University of Kansas students who received Undergraduate Research Awards for spring 2009.

Jamie Lyn Wenke, senior in chemistry, won the award for her research in “Improving the Stability of Recombinant Growth Hormone with Glycosylation and Glycosidase”. Heather Desaire, associate professor of chemistry, is her faculty advisor.

The awards support original, independent research by undergraduates enrolled on the Lawrence campus. The University Honors Program administers the awards with funds from the offices of the provost and vice provost for research and graduate studies and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Full story at http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/6/research.shtml

Jamie was also presented with an Award of Excellence at the Seventh Annual K-INBRE Symposium for her presentation: "Improving the Stability of Recombinant Growth Hormone with Engineered Glycosylation and Glycosidase Trimming of Glycans" (photo at left). Congratulations to Jamie for her continued success!


March 3, 2009: Emilie Mainz and Ben Kurth Successful in IDeA Scholarship Competition
 

Emilie Mainz PhotoBen Kurth Photo

Emilie Mainz from the Sue Lunte Group and Ben Kurth from the Mike Johnson Group have once again received funding to support their research at the Adams Institute. Emilie and Ben were among eight KU recipients of scholarships awarded by the Kansas IDeA (Institutional Development Awards) Network of Biomedical Research Excellence program.

The undergraduate scholarship program at the Lawrence campus is funded through $25.6 million National Institute of Health grant to the Kansas IDeA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence. Joan Hunt, vice chancellor for biomedical research infrastructure at the KU Medical Center and University Distinguished Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology, is principal investigator.

The scholarships encourage students to pursue careers in science and, ultimately, promote biomedical research in Kansas. The spring 2009 the scholarships provide up to $2,000. Scholarships are awarded based on merit and as well as the quality of an applicant’s research proposal. Scholars are selected by a multidisciplinary committee made up of faculty members from molecular biosciences and chemistry. Full story at: http://www.news.ku.edu/2009/march/3/idea.shtml


February 9, 2009: Graham Cooks wins Adams Award for 2009
 

Graham Crooks photo

Graham Cooks, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at Purdue University, is the recipient of the Ralph N. Adams Award in Bioanalytical Chemistry for 2009. The Adams Award is sponsored by the Pittsburgh Conference (Pittcon) and Friends of Ralph N. Adams. The Adams Award was established in 2005 to honor an outstanding scientist who has advanced the field of bioanalytical chemistry through research, innovation, and/or education.

Dr. Cooks' interests involve construction of mass spectrometers and their use in fundamental studies and applications. He has had the pleasure of working with several hundred collaborators from around the world including a hundred Ph. D. students.


February 2, 2009: Adams Undergraduates Selected for K-INBRE Scholarship

Ben Kurth PhotoEmilie Mainz Photo

Undergraduates affiliated with the Adams Institute continue to demonstrate leadership and excellence in research, and to win recognition for these qualities. In the latest example, two Adams undergraduates were among eight KU students selected to receive Kansas IDEA Network of Biomedical Research Excellence (K-INBRE) spring 2009 undergraduate scholarships.

“K-INBRE is a project funded by the National Institutes of Health that includes nine academic institutions in Kansas, including the University of Kansas. One of the goals of the K-INBRE program is to identify and recruit promising undergraduate science students into careers in biomedical research in Kansas. To help achieve this goal, the program has established the K-INBRE Undergraduate Scholarship Program at the University of Kansas to provide financial support and mentoring to promising undergraduate scholars.” (K-INBRE Website)

The scholarships will provide $2,000 for the spring and (contingent of funding) $4,000 for the summer. These funds can be used for any purpose that supports the recipient’s participation in research. In addition, K-INBRE scholars may also enroll in an undergraduate research course and obtain undergraduate credit for their research.

The two Adams recipients are Emilie Mainz, who works in Sue Lunte’s research group, and Ben Kurth, a member of the Mike Johnson group. Emilie, a Goddard sophmore majoring in Biochemistry, is currently working with graduate researcher Courtney Kuhnline on separation of dynorphin peptides using capillary electrophoresis. Emilie plans to continue her education in graduate school following graduation. Ben, an Olathe junior majoring in Cell Biology, is involved in research investigating the affects of photoactivated glutamate on dopamine release in brain slices. After receiving his undergraduate degree, Ben plans to go to the University of Kansas School of Medicine to earn a combined M.D./PhD. Congratulations to both Ben and Emilie for their hard work and success in wining this scholarship.


2008 News

November 3, 2008: Former KU Postdoc and Wife Establish Annual Donation

Seo Scholarship

The KU Endowment Association recently announced that KU friends, Eddie Tatsu Seo and Alice Yoshiko Seo have decided to continue their much appreciated support for the Adams Institute by establishing an annual donation of $2,000 to support undergraduate research. This donation will be used to fund the Seo Research Scholarships. These scholarships will be awarded each year at the Chemistry Honors Banquet to undergraduates who demonstrate dedication to exemplary scholarship and research in Analytical Chemistry. The two Seo Scholars for 2008 were Casey Gee, a member of Mario Rivera’s Research Group, and Jamie Wenke, a member of Heather Desaire’s Research Group.

Dr. Seo was a postdoc in Ralph Adams’ research group, and went on to a successful career as an electrochemist in aerospace and automotive industries. He configured the engine start battery for the AV-8B Harrier II aircraft and established the electrochemical (nipple–air cell) failure mode of automotive coolant hose. Ralph Adams considered mentoring, encouraging, and supporting his students, especially undergraduates, a top priority. He demonstrated a great compassion for his students, and worked unselfishly to their benefit throughout his life. This commitment by the Seos is a very real expression of that philosophy, and a continuation of his legacy. The faculty, students, and research scientists at the Adams Institute would like to express their sincere gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. Seo for their generous support of the Institute.


October 27, 2008: Institute Students Participate In Distance Learning Course

Molecular mechanisms class

This fall, graduate students on the Lawrence Campus are enrolled in a course taught at the KU Medical Center, but are avoiding a costly commute. Videoconferencing technology has made this “virtual class” possible, and is working well for everyone involved. The course is “Molecular Mechanisms of Neurological Disorders”, and is taught by Dr. Steve Levine, a professor in the Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology at KUMC. Dr. Sue Lunte is facilitating the course on the Lawrence campus. The course meets for ninety minutes twice weekly, and in addition to lectures by Dr. Levine and additional KUMC faculty, the students conduct literature research and make presentations on neurological disorders. The students meet with faculty mentors outside of class via videoconference, and have travelled to Kansas City to attend class in person and meet informally with Dr. Levine and their fellow students at the Medical Center. Drs. Levine and Lunte hope this innovative collaboration will lead to more distance learning and a stronger connection between the Lawrence and Kansas City campuses.


August 13, 2008: Craig Lunte Receives Prestigious Research Achievement Award

Craig Lunte

Dr. Craig Lunte is the 2008 recipient of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) Research Achievement Award in Analysis and Pharmaceutical Quality. Dr. Lunte will formally receive this award, among the highest conferred by the AAPS, at the Opening Session of the 2008 AAPS Annual Meeting and Exposition, November 16-20, 2008, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, GA. In her letter announcing the award, Dr. Karen Habucky, President of AAPS, stated that "The continuing high quality of your work and its impact was the basis upon which you were selected as this year's recipient". As this year's winner, Dr. Lunte will receive an honorarium, a framed certificate, and travel expenses to the Annual Meeting and Exposition.


June 27, 2008: Adams Students Among Winners of Fall 2008 Undergraduate Research Award

Casey GeeAlan SchurleJamie Wenke

Three undergraduates working in Adams Institute labs are among 35 KU students who have received Undergraduate Research Awards for summer and fall 2008 semesters. The awards support original, independent research by undergraduates enrolled on the Lawrence campus. Selection criteria included the quality of the proposal, the student’s academic record and ability to complete the proposed research project, the project’s potential contribution to knowledge and the educational value of the research to the student. The Adams students are listed below. A complete listing of recipients can be found in the KU News Release.

Casey Evan Gee, sophomore in chemistry, son of Rick and Ann Gee; Buhler High School; “Purification and Characterization of Bacterioferritin B from Pseudomonas Aeruginosa”; Mario Rivera, professor of chemistry. Alan J. Schurle, junior in liberal arts and sciences, son of Bryan and Brenda Schurle; Manhattan High School; “Dewetting: Methods for Controlling the Phenomenon in Langmuir-Blodgett Films”; Robert Dunn, professor of chemistry. Jamie Lyn Wenke, sophomore in chemistry, daughter of Corwyn Wenke and Sonya Purling; Washburn Rural High School in Topeka; “Recombinant Growth Hormone: The Effects of Forced Glycosylation & Endoglycosidase H on the Protein's Stability & Function”; Heather Desaire, associate professor of chemistry.


June 2, 2008: Middle School Teachers Join Adams Research Teams

Esther AbellonTodd HaagSharon BetzenSue Hicks

Four Kansas middle school science teachers will be working with Adams Institute research teams during the month of June in a professional development program funded by the Kansas Board of Regents. The Middle School Science Academy (MSSA), developed and run by the Center for Science Education at KU, has been working with Kansas middle school science teachers since the summer of 2005 to improve their content knowledge and teaching skills. This summer, 18 teachers from six Kansas school districts are being hosted by faculty research mentors for a 4-week research experience in the departments of Chemistry, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, and Geography.

Esther Abellon and Todd Haag, science teachers at Jardine Middle School in Topeka, are working in the Sue Lunte research group. Dr. Lunte’s group focuses on the development of sensitive and selective analytical methods for the detection of peptides, amino acids, neurotransmitters, and drugs in biological fluids. Sharon Betzen has joined Bob Dunn’s research group, where she will be using high resolution techniques to probe the structure and dynamics of cell membranes. Sharon teaches earth science, biology, and physical science in the 6th 7th and 8th grades at Colwich Elementary School near Wichita. Sue Hicks, a seventh grade teacher at Eisenhower Middle School in Topeka, will be using microdialysis to study chemotherapeutic drug delivery with the researchers in Craig Lunte’s group. Next summer, the teachers will return to KU to incorporate their research experiences into activities that they and other teachers can use in their classrooms. Read moreabout the Middles School Science academy in this KU Connections article.


May 10, 2008: Adams Undergraduates Receive Seo Research Scholarships

Casey GeeJamie Wenke

Two undergraduate researchers from Adams research groups were awarded the first two Seo Research Scholarships at the Chemistry Honors Banquet on May 10. The Seo Research Scholarship provides scholarships of $1,000 to two undergraduates who demonstrate dedication to exemplary scholarship and research in Analytical Chemistry. The two Seo Scholars for 2008 are Casey Gee, a member of Mario Rivera’s Research Group, and Jamie Wenke, a member of Heather Desaire’s Research Group.

Casey is sophomore chemistry major from Hutchinson, and plans to become an M.D.-PhD. or a research scientist (Ph. D.). Casey has maintained a 4.0 GPA in high school (5.0 weighted) and college (4.0 weighted), and is a member of the Honors Program. He will be conducting research full time during the summer of 2008 to purify and characterize pa-BfrB, a bacterioferritin native to the opportunistic bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which can be used in subsequent investigations directed at determining its three-dimensional structure.

Jamie is a sophomore chemistry major from Topeka. She graduated from Washburn Rural High school ranked 12th in her class of 380, with a cumulative weighted GPA of 4.417. She is a K-INBRE Scholar and an NSF Milestone Scholar, and a member of the Honors Program. Jamie will be working on optimizing the stability of a newly developed recombinant growth hormone (rhGH). Developing a more stable rhGH will greatly benefit children undergoing growth hormone therapy, by reducing their injection frequency, Congratulations to Jamie and Casey for their exemplary work and dedication to their research efforts.


April 12, 2008: Graduate Student from the Sue Lunte Group Wins First Place in the Sigma Xi Research Paper Competition

Courtney Kuhnline

Presenting a research topic to scientists outside of the field and the general public can be a daunting task for a researcher. The concepts must be explained in terms accessible to a wide range of people while at the same time communicating the critical content. Courtney Kuhnline, 3rd year doctoral student in Sue Lunte’s research group, demonstrated her ability to effectively communicate her research and consequently won first place in the advanced graduate student division of the Sigma Xi Research Paper Competition held on April 12, 2008. Sigma Xi is an international, multidisciplinary research society whose programs and activities promote the health of the scientific enterprise and honor scientific achievement.

The title of her presentation was “The Development of Quantitative Analytical Techniques for Monitoring both Dynorphin A 1-17 and its Metabolites in the Brain and Peripheral Tissues”. Courtney will receive a one year Associate Membership in Sigma Xi for participating in the competition.


April 9, 2008: KU Cancer Center Receives $2 million Endowed Professorship

KU Cancer Center

The University of Kansas Cancer Center received $2 million from the Morris Family Foundation to establish the Mark and Bette Morris Family Chair in Cancer Prevention, which will support a physician scientist specializing in breast cancer prevention.

The gift was given by Bette Morris in honor of her late husband, Topeka veterinarian Mark Morris Jr. Bette Morris said her husband was passionate about helping the KU Cancer Center become a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center because he knew it would bring the most advanced cancer treatment to the community. Full KU Press Release


April 8, 2008: Undergraduate Research the Focus of KU/Haskell Research Symposium

Symposium Announcement

Haskell Indian Nations University and the Office for Diversity in Science Training at the University of Kansas are sponsoring the Eighth Annual Undergraduate Research Symposium this month. The Symposium will be held April 29, 2008 from 4:00-5:30 pm in Tecumseh Hall on the Haskell campus. Students from KU and Haskell will present the results of research projects completed with KU faculty mentors. For more information, contact:

Office for Diversity in Science Training 1200 Sunnyside Avenue 2040 Haworth (785) 864-3641 odst@ku.edu


March 17, 2008: Guest Researcher to Present Workshop and Seminar

Dr.Henk Lingeman

The Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry and the International Association for Pharmaceutical & Biomedical Analysis (IAPBA) are sponoring a workshop this spring titled “Bioanalytical Sample Preparation: From Introductory to Automated Systems”. The workshop will be presented by Henk Lingeman, Associate Professor in the section of Analytical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy within the Department of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the Free University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Dr. Lingeman’s research mainly concerns the development of automated procedures for the determination of all kinds of analytes, especially drugs, peptides and proteins, in biological and pharmaceutical samples. His emphasis is on sample preparation methods and procedures. He has presented over 100 workshops, courses, tutorials and industry training sessions, all over the world, about these topics. The workshop schedule appears below.

  • April 15: Lecture 1 - Sample Preparation Principles, 4:00 – 6:00, Simons Auditorium
  • April 16: Lecture 2 - Batch Sample Preparation, 4:00 – 6:00, Simons Auditorium
  • April 17: Lecture 3 - On-line Sample Preparation, 3:00 – 5:00, Simons Auditorium

Dr. Lingeman will also be presenting a seminar titled “Selective (on-line) sample preparation for LC-MS analysis of biologically active compounds”, at 11:00 – 12:00, on Tuesday, April 15, in Simons Auditorium, Higuchi Biosciences Center, 2099 Constant Avenue. The seminar is open to the public.


March 3, 2008: Indiana Distinguished Professor Receives Ralph N. Adams Award

Dr. Milos Novotny

Milos V. Novotny, Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Lilly Chemistry Alumni Chair in the Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, and Adjunct Professor of Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine, was awarded the Ralph N. Adams Award in Bioanalytical Chemistry at PITTCON 2008 in New Orleans. The Award is sponsored by the Pittsburgh Conference and Friends of Ralph N. Adams. The Adams Award was established in 2005 to honor an outstanding scientist who has advanced the field of bioanalytical chemistry through research, innovation, and/or education. Dr. Novotny's research currently focuses on substantial improvement in resolution of complex biochemical mixtures and identification of the separated compounds through techniques such as electrospray mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.


February 28, 2008: Adams Graduate Students Selected as Pfizer Scholars

Courtney KuhnlineEric GormanCarrie Woodin

Three graduate students affiliated with the Adams Institute have been selected to join the first cadre of Pfizer Scholars at KU. Courtney Kuhnline, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Eric Gorman, Pharm. Chem. and Carrie Wooden, Chemistry, will join Taryn Bagby, Pharm. Chem. in the first group of KU students to receive this fellowship. Courtney is in Sue Lunte’s group and her research involves peptide analysis and blood brain barrier (BBB) transport. Eric is in Eric Munson’s group, and is working on characterizing solid dosage forms of pharmaceuticals using various analytical techniques, with a focus on solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Carrie is in Bob Dunn’s group, and is conducting research involving study and characterization of recombinant Annexin 6 proteins, and structural analysis of type 3 secretion system proteins. Taryn is a student in Laird Forrest’s group.

The Pfizer Scholars will receive full tuition and a partial stipend from Pfizer to support their research. Congratulations to all four students for their success in earning this prestigious fellowship.


February 24, 2008: KU Research Scientists and Alumni Featured in NYT Article

Darryle Schoep

University of Kansas alumni figure prominently in a New York Times article this week. The article, in the Business section of the February 24 edition, is titled “Daring to Think Differently About Schizophrenia”, and highlights the achievements of Darryle D. Schoepp (at left), Senior Vice President and Head of Neuroscience Research at Merck. Dr. Schoepp was a Postdoctoral Research Associate in Eli Michaelis’ lab in Pharmacology and Toxicology after receiving his doctorate in pharmacology and toxicology at West Virginia University.

Dr. Moghaddam

Also cited in the article is Bita Moghaddam (at left), Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the University of Pittsburgh. Dr Moghaddam received her PhD in Chemistry in 1987 from KU and was a graduate student in Dr. Ralph “Buzz” Adams’ lab. She recently returned to KU to speak at the dedication of the Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry.

Finally, the scientist that conducted much of the chemistry research on LY2140023, a prodrug that figures prominently in the article, is James Monn, another KU alumnus. Dr. Monn received his PhD in Medicinal Chemistry at KU in 1985. Although he is not cited in the NYT article, he was a major contributor to the research described in the article. The contributions of these three prominent scientists to drug discovery and development demonstrate the true multidisciplinary nature of research at University of Kansas. This tradition continues in the Adams Institute.


2007 News

November 13, 2007: Adams Graduate Students Present Award-winning Posters

Kristin PricePradyot Nandi

Two Adams graduate students were selected to present posters and papers to the Graduate Student Symposium in Analysis and Pharmaceutical Quality at the Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) in San Diego, November 11-15, 2007. This program recognizes excellence in graduate education in the fields of pharmaceutics, bioanalytical chemistry and pharmaceutical analysis, and is sponsored by UCB Pharma. Four students were selected from all applicants for this award.

Kristin Price, a doctoral student from St. Joseph, Missouri and Pradyot Nandi, a doctoral student from Kolkata, India, received cash awards of $250, commemorative plaques and complimentary registration and travel expenses to the Annual Meeting. Kristin’s poster and presentation were titled “Tissue-Targeted Metabonomics: Implications of Basal Metabolism Studies for Data Collection and Interpretation.” She is a student in the Craig Lunte Research Group, located in room 240 MRB. Kristin stated that “I was honored to be recognized by the AAPS APQ section through their Graduate Student Award. Through this award, I was given the opportunity to present my research and interact with leading pharmaceutical scientists as well as my peers.”

Pradyot’s poster and presentation were titled “Development of a Microdialysis-microchip Capillary Electrophoresis System for Simultaneously Monitoring Blood Brain Barrier Permeability and Concentration of Brain Neurotransmitters.” Pradyot is a student in the Sue Lunte Research Group, 210 MRB. Congratulations to Kristin and Pradyot for their excellent work, and best wishes as they complete their doctoral programs next year and move forward in their careers.


October 12, 2007: Adams Graduate Student Wins Top Award for Oral Presentation

Congratulations to Kalonie Hulbutta, graduate student in Sue Lunte’s Research Group, for placing first in the Geosciences division at the Annual Conference of the Society for the Advancement of Chicanos and Native Americans in Science (SACNAS) held Oct. 11 – 14 in Kansas City, MO. Kalonie’s oral presentation, “Using GIS and LiDAR for Modeling and Visualization of Localized Sea Level Rise” was based on her undergraduate research at Haskell Indian Nations University, where she received a BS in Environmental Science in May of 2007. During her Junior and Senior years at Haskell, Kalonie conducted research on sea level rise as an undergraduate fellow with the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS). CReSIS continues to support her as she makes the transition to graduate school at KU and participates in the Post-Baccalaureate Research Education Program (PREP). Kalonie plans to enter graduate school in the Pharmaceutical Chemistry department in the fall of 2008.


October 2, 2007: KU Cancer Center gets new deputy director

Sitta Sittapalam

Sitta Sittampalam will join the Kansas University Cancer Center as its deputy director, KU announced Monday. Sittampalam comes to KU after a career in the pharmaceutical industry, including 23 years at Eli Lilly and Co. KU hopes that bringing Sittampalam on board will help turn molecular biology discoveries into disease-fighting drugs. Full article on the Lawrence Journal World Online.

 

October 1, 2007: Dr. Jane Aldrich and Colleagues Awarded $2.2 Million Dollar NIH Grant

Jane Aldrich

The University of Kansas, in collaboration with Creighton and Northeastern Universities, has been awarded a 5 year $2.2 million dollar grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to identify possible treatments for cocaine abuse. The project entitled "Peptidic Kappa Opioid Receptor Ligands as Potential Treatments for Drug Addiction,” is headed by Dr. Jane Aldrich, Professor of Medicinal Chemistry in the School of Pharmacy at KU in collaboration with Dr. Kenneth Audus, Dean of the School of Pharmacy and Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, and Dr. Susan Lunte, R. N. Adams Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, at the University of Kansas, Dr. Thomas Murray, Chair and Professor of Pharmacology at Creighton University School of Medicine, and Dr. Jay McLaughlin, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Northeastern University.

Cocaine is a major illegal drug of abuse, with nearly 2 million cocaine users in the U.S., but there is currently no medication available to treat cocaine abuse and addiction. The researchers will examine compounds synthesized in Dr. Aldrich's laboratory for their ability to block cocaine-seeking behavior in animal models. Stress can cause animals or people who have quit taking cocaine to begin taking the drug again. Particularly exciting are recent results showing that compounds that block kappa opioid receptors, including compounds identified in Dr. Aldrich's laboratory, can block this reinstatement of drug seeking behavior caused by stress. The project involves examining the compounds synthesized in Dr. Aldrich's laboratory for their ability to cross into the brain to reach their site of action and the evaluation of their biological activity both in cell culture and in animal models. The goal of the research is to identify compounds that can modify cocaine-seeking behavior and that can lead to treatments for cocaine abuse.


August 24, 2007: Sue Lunte and Students Win 2007 AAPS Outstanding Manuscript Award in Analysis and Pharmaceutical Quality

Sue LunteBarbara FogartyBrian HuynhPradyot Nandi

Dr Sue Lunte, Adams Institute Director, received confirmation today that a paper written by members of her research group has been selected as the Outstanding Manuscript in Analysis and Pharmaceutical Quality by the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists. The paper, “A microchip electrophoresis device with on-line microdialysis sampling and on-chip sample derivation by naphthalene 2, 3- dicarbboxaldehyde/2-mercaptoethanol for amino acid and peptide analysis,” was coauthored by Dr. Lunte and graduate students Barbara A. Fogarty, Bryan H. Huynh, and Pradyot Nandi.


August 21, 2007: Ralph Adams Alumnus and Wife give $1K to Undergraduate Research Awards Fund

test tubes clipart

Dr. Eddie Tatsu Seo and his wife, Alice Yoshiko Seo have generously donated $1,000 to the Adams Institute Undergraduate Research Awards Fund. These funds will support undergraduates in academic year or summer research. Our heartfelt thanks to the Seos for their support of the Adams Institute.

 

 


July 31, 2007: Bloch gives $1M to KU cancer center

Cancer Screening image

Philanthropist and civic leader Annette Bloch will donate $1 million to The University of Kansas Hospital's new Cancer Center and Medical Pavilion. Bloch decided to make the gift after a recent tour of the 55,000-square-foot facility, at Shawnee Mission Parkway and Rainbow Boulevard in Westwood. Full article in the Lawrence Journal World Online

 


April 20, 2007: Craig Lunte awarded Wright Graduate Mentor award

Craig Lunte

Congratulations to Professor Craig Lunte for being awarded the John C. Wright Graduate Mentor Award by the CLAS graduate school. Joseph Steinmetz, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, presented the award to Professor Lunte in an April 25 ceremony in the Burge Union..Full article in The Oread

 

 


February 28, 2007: George Wilson awarded the Reilley Award at PITTCON

George Wilson

The Society of Electroanalytical Chemistry and Bioanalytical Systems awarded George Wilson, Higuchi Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, the Reilley Award, named for the late researcher Charles N. Reilley. Wilson received the award for his contributions to the theory, instrument development and applications of electroanalysis. Full article in The Oread

 

 


2006 News

November 2, 2006: Eric Crick & Arvind Chappa receive awards at AAPS meeting

Eric Crick

Congratulations to Eric Crick, (Craig Lunte Lab) and Arvind Chappa, (Susan Lunte Lab) who received awards for their research in pharmaceutical chemistry at the annual American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists meeting and exposition, October 29 - November 2, 2006, Henry B. Gonzalez Convention Center,San Antonio, TX,. Crick and Chappa are among 38 graduate students who were selected to present their research at the symposia. Crick's award is based on his research in analysis and pharmaceutical quality at KU. Chappa's award is based on his research in drug design and discovery at KU. November 2006 MRB News


October 21, 2006: Adams Institute Dedication Ceremony

Adams Dedication

On a rainy October 21, 2006, the Ralph N. Adams Institute for Bioanalytical Chemistry was dedicated at the Multidisciplinary Research Building. The rain did not dampen the spirits of the 100 people who attended the dedication ceremony. Gini Adams and her family were guests of honors at the dedication which included comments by Dean Joe Steinmetz of the College; Dean Ken Audus from Pharmacy; Dr. George Wilson, Vice Provost for Research; Dr. Susan Lunte, Ralph N. Adams Distinguished Professor; Dr. Ted Kuwana, Regents Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Chemistry; and Lisa Boley, representing the family. The dedication included a museum of “Buzz’s” old equipment, student thesis and a collage of pictures from the departmental files.

After the dedication, a group of 75 headed over to Nichols Hall for lunch and a symposium on Bioanalytical Chemistry. Individuals presenting talks on their research were Dr. Susan Lunte and Dr. Heather Desaire from the KU Chemistry Department, Dr. Bita Moghaddam, from Penn State and Dr. Mark Wightman, from the University of North Carolina, both of whom are former students of Buzz Adams.

The evening ended with a dinner held at the Alvamar Country Club where members of the Adams group spoke about Buzz and his commitments to education and research. There were twenty-five former students or technicians in attendance. Gini Adams thanked all of those who came back to honor Buzz and his legacy research. Selected photos from the dedication, seminar, and dinner can be viewed here. December 2006 Chemistry Alumni News


May, 2006: Heather Desaire wins ASMS research award for new faculty.

Heather Desaire

Heather Desaire, assistant professor of chemistry, has won the American Society for Mass Spectrometry's research award for new faculty for her work on how HIV hides from the human immune system. She will be presented with the $25,000 unrestricted research award in May. Full article in The Oread

 


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